Trayvon Martin’s Death and the Stand Your Ground Law vs. the Duty to Reatreat

There are few things more sad than an avoidable death. And I guess few things more unavoidable than using that death to push for a political position, as we see in the death of Trayvon Martin. Young Mr. Martin was a 17 year old walking home from the store when he was confronted by neighborhood watch “captain” George Zimmerman, who apparently (hopefully) thought he was protecting the neighborhood. But when the situation ended the teenage Martin hadn’t just been confronted or even picked up by the police, he was dead. But did Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law have anything to do with it? And if so, for whom?

It was a death that didn’t have to happen, for sure, and should have all of us questioning ourselves and what we would do in a similar situation whichever side we are on. But the political focus of those using young Mr. Martin’s tragic death has been on a Florida law, commonly called the “Stand Your Ground” law, that removes the duty to retreat for someone under assault and allows them to use force to defend themselves if they feel threatened. But the ironic thing is the person who chose not to . . . → Read More: Trayvon Martin’s Death and the Stand Your Ground Law vs. the Duty to Reatreat

Pink Guns are Good News for Women!

Here’s an article about a woman who finds effeminate pink handguns disgusting. Here’s another about a woman who used an effeminate pink handgun to defend her life and her fiance’s life against an ex-con. Who’s outlook do you hold in the highest regard?

A lovely little pink sig. Just darling!

Dee Edwards, co-founder of the UK charity Mothers Against Murder and Aggression (which would seem to do some good work other than just being anti-gun, judging from their website), said: “I am utterly disgusted by this. It is not fashion, it is not style, it is … glorifying guns and making them seem acceptable.”

Hmmm. Actually, I don’t think the color of guns has much to do with more and more Americans — and American women in particular – finding guns “acceptable.” I think it has to do with stories like that of Meghan Brown and many, many others. Although the number of American’s who use guns for self defense is much debated, I think it’s clearly in the 10′s of thousands and could very well be in the low millions (like 2.5 million times per year).

A woman who used a darling little pink pistol to defend . . . → Read More: Pink Guns are Good News for Women!

Joe Zamudio, the legal CCWer who intervened in the Tucson massacre

Plenty of others have commented on Joe Zamudio, who ran TOWARDS the gunfire with weapon ready when Jared Loughner opened fire on Rep. Giffords’ meeting. We on the pro-gun side  honor his courage for running toward the violence. Those on the anti-gun side consider him one of the dangers of the day, being he didn’t kill the bad guy (anti-gun people care only about body count) and as he surveyed the situation he initially targeted an innocent man helping to disarm Loughner. Did Zamudio’s legally carried firearm save the day? No. Did it empower another civilian to run to the aid of those fighting Loughner instead of fleeing the gunfire as other unarmed civilians did? Hell yeah! If Loughner had succeeded in his reload and eluded those that tackled him, was his shooting rampage over once Zamudio appeared? Probably. The bottom line … the gun Zamudio carried was nothing but good. And if you’re ever in such a situation where gunfire breaks out and no police are around … you’d better hope there is a Zamudio in the area.

The facts of what happened in Tucson challenge two constantly repeated tenets of the opposing sides of the gun debate; the . . . → Read More: Joe Zamudio, the legal CCWer who intervened in the Tucson massacre

My in-depth and scientific study and analysis of the defensive use of Guns in America …

As a guy who likes guns but really wants to know the truth, I decided to spend some time and effort looking into defensive gun uses by concealed carry permit holders. So I started running automated searches, and though what I did was only an “in depth and scientific study” by the standards of the by the anti-gun “Violence” Policy Center (VPC), which calls a google search and the culling of specific types of stories to be a “study” worthy of presentation to congress to derail pro self-defense legislation — I do have some worthwhile observations to present.

I spent a full month, from 11/23 to 12/23, looking at the results of google searches for stories about homeowners shooting burglars, people in the street shooting muggers, etc. — and then reported and scored only the stories that appeared to be a legitimate defensive gun use.  But since I only got those stories that my searches caught (and I know I missed many, because I found stories elsewhere that did not appear in my searches) and thus only those that appeared in online news sources … it’s far from a legitimate study of any kind. And while VPC calls such a . . . → Read More: My in-depth and scientific study and analysis of the defensive use of Guns in America …

Blind people, elephants, and guns

Brady Campaign board member Joan Peterson’s most recent post relates the famous parable of the three blind men trying to identify an elephant by touching it, and of course each only touches a small area and comes away with a different impression of what an elephant looks like. Is that how we all look at the gun issue? From our own limited experiences? How else could we?

But of course, her own post acknowledges that she is as blind as anyone and doesn’t understand the issue better than anyone else, however self righteous she often is.

But that’s why we have a democratic form of government. When viewing an issue like this, that affects 300 million people, the only way to deal with it is via concensus; maybe none of us as individuals can see the whole elephant, but by debating, forming groups, comparing notes, etc., we eventually agree upon what the elephant looks like and what we need to do about it.

The NRA and Brady Campaign are both putting forth an idea on what the issue looks like. To date, who’s winning?

Here’s my response:

I don’t know that any of us are completely blind on this issue, . . . → Read More: Blind people, elephants, and guns

Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-22-2010

Score on today’s unique stories (mostly unique, anyway, I’ve tried to avoid counting the same general story twice — cases may still be under investigation and EVERYONE is innocent until proven guilty):

Home Defense: 3

Score on stories since 11/23/2010:

Home Defense: 29 Business Defense: 15 CCW defensive use: 8 General street defensive use: 3

(all of the above refers only to stories I have identified via generic google searches of news stories — a more thorough search would produce many, many more)

A former military man in San Antonio, TX, shoots a man allegedly burglarizing his neighbors house. If you’re committing a crime and an armed person tells you to “stop” … it’s best to do so. If he looks like former military … even more so.

A homeowner in Saline County, MO,  chases off an alleged burglar. It was his wife who first realized the man was trying to break in, and she did the smart thing; she armed herself with a handgun. At that point she no longer had the potential of being a helpless victim, though she smartly then stayed in the house.

This story doesn’t sound very good to me . . . → Read More: Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-22-2010

Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-20-2010

Score on today’s unique stories (mostly unique, anyway, I’ve tried to avoid counting the same general story twice — cases may still be under investigation and EVERYONE is innocent until proven guilty):

Home Defense: 2 CCW Defensive use: 2

Score on stories since 11/23/2010:

Home Defense: 26 Business Defense: 15 CCW defensive use: 8 General street defensive use: 3

(all of the above refers only to stories I have identified via a generic google search of news stories — a more thorough search would produce many, many more)

In Pascagoula, MS, a man walked into his apartment and found 3 alleged burglars. They fired, he was not defenseless and fired back … and the 3 men ran off in different directions.

In Houston, TX, a business owner returning to his store was assaulted and hit in the head. The alleged robber took a bag of cash from the owner and ran to a vehicle. The owner fired at the vehicle with his pistol, and one of the men ended up dead.

A woman who shot her husband at their home in Northport, AL,  claimed she was acting in self-defense. Domestic violence is ugly no matter . . . → Read More: Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-20-2010

Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-17-2010

Score on today’s unique stories (mostly unique, anyway, I’ve tried to avoid counting the same general story twice — cases may still be under investigation and EVERYONE is innocent until proven guilty). I’m still not caught up, but here are a few day’s more worth:

Home Defense: 2 Business Defense: 6 CCW Defensive use:

Score on stories since 11/23/2010:

Home Defense: 24 Business Defense: 15 CCW defensive use: 6 General street defensive use: 3

(all of the above refers only to stories I have identified via a generic google search of news stories — a more thorough search would produce many, many more) The Hidalgo County, TX, Sheriff’s Department confirmed a man connected to a home invasion who showed up at a Valley hospital and later died, was shot by the homeowner. The homeowner was apparently an illegal alien, but does that take away his right to self defense? (assuming it actually was self defense, of course).

Man shoots alleged burglar in leg at Oklahoma City hot rod shop. If you’re robbing some place, and the owner points a .45 at you … it’s best to do what he says. Or at least not threaten him . . . → Read More: Armed Citizens in the news, (through) 12-17-2010

Movie: A girl and a gun

As the father of two little girls … I love stuff like this (from the girlsguidetoguns blog):

A Girl and A Gun Trailer from Cathryne Czubek on Vimeo.

More on citizens, including college students, using guns to fight off attackers

This article is interesting. It starts out by detailing the CCW defense story I reported a few days ago from Georgia, where 23 year old Georgia tech student Ryan Moore used his legally carried firearm to fight off two attackers (one died), but goes on to detail 6 other incidents seen in the Atlanta, GA, metro area. Most are of home owners/residents and business owners fighting off attackers. It’s a short read and has some interesting quotes from police and leaders of both anti and pro gun groups.

Now that we know that the CCW defense story was about a College student … good thing he hadn’t just come from campus, or if he had chose to ignore restrictions against guns on campus … or he would have been helpless when confronted. People against CCW on campuses paint everybody on campus as a drunk, possibly drugged 19 year old (who couldn’t carry in most states because of age, anyway). But the fact is … there are many older students, like Mr. Moore, and some of them are veterans.

One interesting line here from an anti-gun group:

“It’s certainly appropriate to defend yourself if your life is in danger,” said Alice . . . → Read More: More on citizens, including college students, using guns to fight off attackers