Traveling with a concealed weapon: Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site / National Park

The exterior of Bent's Fort

Since I still get a lot of traffic to my post about carrying a firearm at Yellowstone National Park, I’ve decided to add an entire category for my observations of traveling with a firearm. Obviously I’m no lawyer, and you need to figure for yourself if you’re legal to carry a firearm ANYWHERE, but these are my observations. And Bent’s Old Fort near Pueblo, Colorado, is not a site you can carry a firearm at … unless you want to limit your visit to a walk around the exterior of the exhibits. But it’s a great site and don’t let that deter you in the least.

First off, if you’re visiting Southern Colorado, this is worth straying off the Interstate for a couple of hours to take in. It’s a faithfully recreated trapper’s fort from pre-civil war days, and as you walk through the various rooms you can’t help but think back to those days and what life was like in the rugged pioneer period. And the ranger we talked to (there were only two working there in the off-season) was a super nice guy dressed in period apparel rather than the usual Smokey-the-bear hat.

The exterior of Bent's . . . → Read More: Traveling with a concealed weapon: Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site / National Park

Carrying a gun in Yellowstone National Park … or any other National Park or Monument

Earlier this summer (I started to write this post awhile ago and forgot about it) I loaded up the wife and kids in the Family Truckster (aka Mini van) and headed out on a driving/camping tour of Yellowstone National Park and a few other NPs and Monuments. And since as of February, 2010, National Parks and Monuments have been forced to honor state laws when it comes to gun possession, my .357 revolver came along for the ride. Now this post is in no way intended to be a legal reference for others (I ain’t a lawyer), but my observations may be helpful in planning a trip to Yellowstone or another NP or monument. At least as a starting point, but make sure you verify the legalities of what you do before you do it.

The Park Service has their new regulations up on their website, along with specific information for most parks, and they’re surprisingly straightforward; follow state laws and don’t carry into any Federal facilities. And a Federal Facility is basically anything other than a stand-alone bathroom that either is a building, looks like a building, or has something reminiscent of a door — details to follow.

Some . . . → Read More: Carrying a gun in Yellowstone National Park … or any other National Park or Monument